2018-19 Dancer Profile: Kaleena Burks

Meet Kansas City Ballet Company Dancer, Kaleena Burks. She’s danced with KCB since the 2010-11 season and recently danced the role of Glinda the Good Witch in Septime Webre’s world premiere of The Wizard of Oz at the Kauffman Center Oct. 12-21, 2018.

Q: TELL US WHY YOU BeCAME A DANCEr.

A: My mother put me in ballet classes when I was young, and I fell in love with dance from there.

KC Ballet Dancers Kaleena Burks and Amanda DeVenuta. Photography by Brett Pruitt & East Market Studios.
KC Ballet Dancers Kaleena Burks and Amanda DeVenuta. Photography by Brett Pruitt & East Market Studios.

Q: WHAT DO YOU LIKE TO DO WHEN YOU’RE NOT DANCING?

A: When I’m not dancing I very much enjoy relaxing at home and reading a good book.

Q: WHAT IS SOMETHING MOST PEOPLE WOULDN’T KNOW ABOUT YOU?

A: Most people probably don’t know that I’m an avid crocheter.

Q: WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE SNACK?

A: My go to snack while dancing will always be a banana. It’s the perfect food to nourish you and give you energy.

Q: WHAT IS THE BEST DANCING ADVICE YOU RECEIVED AND WHY?

A: Someone once told me when I was having a bad day, “Kaleena, everyday can’t be Christmas.” That has really stuck with me throughout my career. As much as we all want to be at our best every single day, sometimes our body fights against us. The key to being a successful ballerina is learning how to make the days special and worthwhile that aren’t Christmas.

PAST PROFILE POSTS

Dancer Profile: Kaleena Burks

Dancer Spotlight: Kaleena Burks

 

Top Photo by Brett Pruitt & East Market Studios

Event Recap: Guild 2018 Fall Luncheon

Guild President Susan Meehan-Mizer, Susan Sands, Melinda Petet. Photography by Larry F. Levenson.
Guild President Susan Meehan-Mizer, Susan Sands, Melinda Petet. Photography by Larry F. Levenson.

On September 27, Kansas City Ballet Guild hosted their 2018-2019 Season’s Fall Luncheon at Webster House. Members, new and old, enjoyed a delicious luncheon followed by a welcome from the Guild President Susan Meehan-Mizer.

Event Photos

Artistic Director Devon Carney, Vicki Baxter, Sue Ann Fagerberg, Executive Director Jeffrey J. Bentley. Photography by Larry F. Levenson.
Artistic Director Devon Carney, Vicki Baxter, Sue Ann Fagerberg, Executive Director Jeffrey J. Bentley. Photography by Larry F. Levenson.
Gigi Rose and Craig Sole. Photography by Larry F. Levenson.
Gigi Rose and Craig Sole. Photography by Larry F. Levenson.
Gigi Rose, Juliette Singer, Melissa Ford, Mary Beth Hershey, Kathy Nordhus. Photography by Larry F. Levenson.
Gigi Rose, Juliette Singer, Melissa Ford, Mary Beth Hershey, Kathy Nordhus. Photography by Larry F. Levenson.
Pattie Lou Cleary, Glenda Lee Touslee, Lisa Hickok. Photography by Larry F. Levenson.
Pattie Lou Cleary, Glenda Lee Touslee, Lisa Hickok. Photography by Larry F. Levenson.
Front row: Sue Ann Fagerberg, Juliette Singer, Guild President Susan Meehan-Mizer, Linda Peakes, Second Row: Barbara Eiszner, Gail Van Way, Gigi Rose, Jo Anne Dondlinger, Edie Downing, Mary Beth Hershey, Back Row: Vicki Baxter, Becky Quinn, Peggy Beal, Cydni James. Photography by Larry F. Levenson.
Front row: Sue Ann Fagerberg, Juliette Singer, Guild President Susan Meehan-Mizer, Linda Peakes, Second Row: Barbara Eiszner, Gail Van Way, Gigi Rose, Jo Anne Dondlinger, Edie Downing, Mary Beth Hershey, Back Row: Vicki Baxter, Becky Quinn, Peggy Beal, Cydni James. Photography by Larry F. Levenson.
Gigi Rose and Craig Sole. Photography by Larry F. Levenson.
Gigi Rose and Craig Sole. Photography by Larry F. Levenson.
New Guild Members: Carrie Kruse, Stephanie Eppler, Cyndi James, Linda Peakes, Becky Quinn, Pattie Lou Cleary, Melissa Cavanaugh, Whitney Hosty. Photography by Larry F. Levenson.
New Guild Members: Carrie Kruse, Stephanie Eppler, Cyndi James, Linda Peakes, Becky Quinn, Pattie Lou Cleary, Melissa Cavanaugh, Whitney Hosty. Photography by Larry F. Levenson.

Photography: Larry F. Levenson.

Cameron Thomas Benched

Kansas City Ballet company dancer Cameron Thomas started playing the piano around 6 or 7 years old. Encouraged by his parents, he took lessons until ninth grade and then continued studying music through school orchestra, music theory classes, and even independently.  Playing music has since evolved into a sort of hobby/passion project. In September, Kansas City Ballet Music Director Ramona Pansegrau hired him as a part-time accompanist for Kansas City Ballet School.

We asked Cameron about his experience on the piano bench and he had plenty to say.

Q: WHAT DO YOU ENJOY ABOUT PLAYING MUSIC?

A: It has always been something I do just for me without pressure or obligation.  Ballet is my passion for sure, but it is also a very demanding and often stressful job.  Don’t get me wrong—dance is well worth it, especially at a place like Kansas City Ballet, but it’s also nice to have music as both an escape and a means to make myself and others smile once in a while…  It’s fun!

Q: MUSIC AND DANCE JUST GO TOGETHER. DOES BEING TALENTED AT BOTH MAKE IT DIFFICULT TO FOCUS ON ONE OR THE OTHER?

A: If I were seriously pursuing music, it would be very difficult to balance it with ballet. Any discipline like ballet demands a fairly exclusive commitment at the professional level.  However, I was fortunate enough to build at least a decent understanding of music from a relatively early age, which has allowed me to more passively improve my own skills at the piano over a longer period of time. I have had stretches where I play often and see improvements, but also times when my workload demands I stop playing for a while. Over several years, I felt I had built a small repertoire of music I could use to play for ballet class, and our music director Ramona Pansegrau was kind enough to give me a shot. So far, so good.

Q: PLAYING PIANO FOR BALLET CLASS IS NOT AS EASY AS IT SOUNDS. WHAT HAS BEEN THE BIGGEST CHALLENGE FOR YOU? WHAT HAVE YOU ENJOYED MOST ABOUT PLAYING FOR CLASSES?

A: Playing for ballet class is definitely not easy for a number of reasons beyond just knowing how to play the piano. Coming from a background of ballet, my challenge is probably different than that of most accompanists.  Often, the challenging part for a pianist is identifying what the appropriate time signature, tempo, quality, duration, or phrasing of a piece of music should be so that it actually works with a given combination.  Of course, good accompanists do this easily, but I would imagine it is a steep learning curve for those who are new to the vocabulary and structure of a ballet class.  Conveniently for me, I am very familiar with ballet, so that part has come fairly easily!  My challenge is the opposite.  Finding new music or tailoring music I already know to fit the needs of ballet combinations was harder for me as I have far less repertoire than a professional pianist.  Also I’ll openly admit, I have some limitations with how well I can actually play difficult music.  Luckily I listen and learn from the best every single day in class! Ramona has also been very helpful in providing me resources to help me out.

Q: HOW DOES BEING A BALLET DANCER HELP WHEN PLAYING FOR BALLET CLASS?

A: Huge yes, as I said in the last answer.  It’s way easier to figure out what to play for a given combination when you know the dancer’s perspective.  I find I can often anticipate what exercise is coming next, what tempo is appropriate, or how to phrase the music much more easily because I’ve taken so many ballet classes as a dancer.

Q: WHEN YOU HEAR A GORGEOUS PIECE OF MUSIC, WHAT COMES FIRST FOR YOU, IMAGINING DANCING TO IT OR PLAYING IT?

A: That’s such an interesting question.  Definitely playing it, or at least listening to it in an active, constructive way. Though music is probably the single most significant inspiration for movement, I am usually just listening, not creating original movement.  Maybe that’s why I don’t have the choreographic bug.  Interpreting a choreographer’s vision of that music through movement is the really amazing part for me, but it is often the most challenging.  The way choreographers interpret music is often remarkably dissimilar from the way the music itself is written.  Sometimes it is challenging to hear more complicated music one way and have it set to movement in a contradictory way, but that is the case for all dancers.  Having a deep understanding of music really helps that process.

Q: FOR WHICH CLASSES DO YOU PLAY? HOW DO STUDENTS RESPOND WHEN THEY REALIZE YOU ARE A PROFESSIONAL COMPANY DANCER?

A: I play for our community engagement students from the R.O.A.D. (Reach out and Dance) program on Wednesdays and the adult beginner open class on Thursdays.  The R.O.A.D. kids are young (9-10 years old) so honestly they’re not always the most aware of the fact that I’m a professional dancer and what that might mean besides the fact that I dance a lot.  They do love the music though, it does not go unnoticed. The adults really enjoy it; they often ask about how I am doing or what the company is working on. They also know that I am relatively new to accompaniment as they are to ballet, and so it creates a light, fun environment.

Q: HAS ANYTHING SURPRISED YOU ABOUT PLAYING FOR CLASSES?

A: What’s most surprising is how gratifying it has been.  Sadly, and I am guilty of this as well, most professional dancers are so accustomed to live music in the classroom that it has become an expectation.  We are far more inclined to notice when there is either something wrong with the music being played or no live accompaniment at all.  That has not been my experience with my classes thus far.  In the classes I play, live accompaniment is a novelty.  They greet me with smiles and positive feedback, sometimes even between combinations. I am grateful to have the opportunity to play for them.

Q: IS THERE ANYTHING ELSE YOU’D LIKE TO SHARE ABOUT YOUR EXPERIENCES?

A: Live music makes ballet class of all skill levels better. If done well, it changes the entire dynamic of a room and can make the class infinitely more productive and enjoyable.  We are lucky to have it here at Kansas City Ballet and I am so excited to learn how to hopefully bring that to a classroom myself.

 

Top photo by Tom Styrkowicz and 53Tom, LLC.

Event Recap: 2018-19 Season Launch Party

Richard Jensen, Pam and (Artistic Director) Devon Carney, Susan and Zack Hangauer, Gay Dannelly
Richard Jensen, Pam and (Artistic Director) Devon Carney, Susan and Zack Hangauer, Gay Dannelly

Artistic Director Devon Carney and Executive Director Jeffrey J. Bentley welcomed guests to the 61st season of Kansas City Ballet at its annual Season Launch Party on Oct. 12, 2018 at One Park Place and a post-show reception at the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts. Members of the Ballet’s Bolender Society enjoyed an elegant event reflective of the artistic themes of the season. Following the fete, Bolender Society members enjoyed the world premiere of Septime Webre’s The Wizard of Oz at the Kauffman Center. Upcoming Kansas City Ballet performances include The Nutcracker (Nov. 30 – Dec. 23), Lady of the Camellias (Feb. 15-24), New Moves (March 28-31), and Tharp, Parsons, Forsythe (May 10-19). For tickets or more information, visit kcballet.org.

Event Photos

Julia Irene Kauffman, Thomas and Loren Whittaker, Carol Feiock
Julia Irene Kauffman, Thomas and Loren Whittaker, Carol Feiock
Daniel Rodriguez, John and Angela Walker, Josh Bodden, Septime Webre
Daniel Rodriguez, John and Angela Walker, Josh Bodden, Septime Webre
Jeff and Ashley Crouch, Susan Lordi and Dennis Marker
Jeff and Ashley Crouch, Susan Lordi and Dennis Marker
Howard Rothwell, Lilliana Hagerman, Lamin Pereira dos Santos, Kathy Stepp
Howard Rothwell, Lilliana Hagerman, Lamin Pereira dos Santos, Kathy Stepp
Dr. David S. McGee, Amanda DeVenuta, Mark Sappington
Dr. David S. McGee, Amanda DeVenuta, Mark Sappington

Photography:  Don Ipock

Event Recap: The Emerald City Ball

Honorary Chairmen Mr. and Mrs. W. Anthony Feiock, Mr. and Mrs. Gary Rose, Executive Director Mr. Jeffrey J. Bentley. Photography by Larry F. Levenson.
Honorary Chairmen Mr. and Mrs. W. Anthony Feiock, Mr. and Mrs. Gary Rose, Executive Director Mr. Jeffrey J. Bentley. Photography by Larry F. Levenson.

On Saturday, October 6, the Kansas City Ballet Guild presented the Emerald City Ball, a celebration of Kansas City Ballet’s world premiere of Septime Webre’s The Wizard of Oz, at the beautiful InterContinental Kansas City At The Plaza. Guests enjoyed a lively cocktail party, delicious cuisine, breathtaking decor by Larry Wheeler and Craig Sole Designs, crowd-pleasing entertainment by Michael Beers Band, and a spectacular runway show featuring the fashions of Oz narrated by costume designer Liz Vandal. Gigi Rose chaired the event. Carol and W. Anthony Feiock, whose involvement with Kansas City Ballet has been long and noteworthy, served as honorary chairman. Guild President Susan Meehan-Mizer and Kansas City Ballet Executive Director Jeffrey J. Bentley presented the 2018 Pirouette Award to Frank Byrne, executive director of the Kansas City Symphony, for his outstanding contribution to the performing arts.

EVENT PHOTOS

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Cohen, Mr. Devon Carney, Ms. Liz Vandal. Photography by Larry F. Levenson.
Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Cohen, Mr. Devon Carney, Ms. Liz Vandal. Photography by Larry F. Levenson.
Mrs. John Walker, Trainee Miss Leah Upchurch, Mr. John Walker, Trainee Miss Juliana Kuhm. Photography by Larry F. Levenson
Mrs. John Walker, Trainee Miss Leah Upchurch, Mr. John Walker, Trainee Miss Juliana Kuhm. Photography by Larry F. Levenson
Ms. Kristina Klug, Ms. Kim Stevens, Mrs. Cliff Illig, Ms. Kathy Fallon, Ms. Collette Harrison, Ms. Sandy Pummill, Ms. Charmaine Pummill, Ms. Rachel Thompson, Ms. Leah FitzGerald, Ms. Gretchen FitzGerald. Photography by Larry F. Levenson.
Ms. Kristina Klug, Ms. Kim Stevens, Mrs. Cliff Illig, Ms. Kathy Fallon, Ms. Collette Harrison, Ms. Sandy Pummill, Ms. Charmaine Pummill, Ms. Rachel Thompson, Ms. Leah FitzGerald, Ms. Gretchen FitzGerald. Photography by Larry F. Levenson.
Beautiful ambiance, floral by Mr. Larry Wheeler and Mr. Craig Sole. Photography by Larry F. Levenson.
Beautiful ambiance, floral by Mr. Larry Wheeler and Mr. Craig Sole. Photography by Larry F. Levenson.
Mr. Ian Spinks, Ms. Juliette Singer, Mr. and Mrs. Bill Dondlinger, Mr. and Mrs. Gary Rose, Chairwoman, Mr. Septime Weber, Mr. and Mrs. Randy Downing. Photography by Larry F. Levenson.
Mr. Ian Spinks, Ms. Juliette Singer, Mr. and Mrs. Bill Dondlinger, Mr. and Mrs. Gary Rose, Chairwoman, Mr. Septime Weber, Mr. and Mrs. Randy Downing. Photography by Larry F. Levenson.
Costume Fashion Show announced by Costume Designer Liz Vandal (middle). Members of Kansas City Ballet's Second Company walked the runway. Photography by Larry F. Levenson
Costume Fashion Show announced by Costume Designer Liz Vandal (middle). Members of Kansas City Ballet’s Second Company walked the runway. Photography by Larry F. Levenson
KCB Trainee Mr. Jeremy Hanson, Company dancer Ms. Tempe Ostergren, Mr. and Mrs. Josh Rowland, Mr. and Mrs. Jim Stowers, Mr. and Mrs. Bill Parkerson, Mr. and Mrs. Spencer Jones, Mr. and Mrs. Bill Esrey. Photography by Larry F. Levenson.
KCB Trainee Mr. Jeremy Hanson, Company dancer Ms. Tempe Ostergren, Mr. and Mrs. Josh Rowland, Mr. and Mrs. Jim Stowers, Mr. and Mrs. Bill Parkerson, Mr. and Mrs. Spencer Jones, Mr. and Mrs. Bill Esrey. Photography by Larry F. Levenson.
Executive Director Mr. Jeffrey J. Bentley, Pirouette Award Winner Mr. Frank Byrne, Ballet Guild President Ms. Susan Meehan-Mizer. Photography by Larry F. Levenson.
Executive Director Mr. Jeffrey J. Bentley, Pirouette Award Winner Mr. Frank Byrne, Ballet Guild President Ms. Susan Meehan-Mizer. Photography by Larry F. Levenson.

 

Photography by Larry F. Levenson

2018-19 Trainee Dancer Profile: Jeremy Hanson

Meet Kansas City Ballet Trainee and Second Company Dancer, Jeremy Hanson. Jeremy attended Kansas City Ballet School and graduated last spring. He was offered a position as a Trainee for the 2018-19 Season. Trainees and KCB II Dancers make up Kansas City Ballet’s Second Company.

Jeremy is the puppeteer for Toto in Kansas City Ballet’s performances of The Wizard of Oz at the Kauffman Center now through Sunday, Oct. 21st.

Q: TELL US WHY YOU BeCAME A DANCEr.

A: My mom is the owner of my dance studio back home, so naturally, she made me take a variety of dance classes from a very young age. At first I hated the idea of dancing to the point where she had to bribe me with snacks if I was able to complete a full dance class, but eventually, my passion and love for the art form grew into what it is today.

Company Dancer Amanda DeVenuta and Second Company Dancer Jeremy Hanson in The Wizard of Oz. Photography by Brett Pruitt & East Market Studios.
Company Dancer Amanda DeVenuta and Second Company Dancer Jeremy Hanson in The Wizard of Oz. Photography by Brett Pruitt & East Market Studios.

Q: WHAT DO YOU LIKE TO DO WHEN YOU’RE NOT DANCING?

A: I love taking photos and videos and especially love editing them and making them into something that shows off my creativity. It’s another way I love to express myself and try to do it as often as I can when I’m not dancing.

Q: WHAT IS SOMETHING MOST PEOPLE WOULDN’T KNOW ABOUT YOU?

A: The umbilical cord was wrapped around my neck twice when I was born. My mom had to go off sugar completely because the doctors were very worried I wouldn’t be able to slip through when I was finally born. I’m very fortunate to be alive today, much less being as fortunate as I am to be doing what I love every day.

Q: WHAT IS YOUR GUILTY PLEASURE?

A: Hip-Hop. I started out my passion for dancing in a completely different genre than Ballet. When I can I try to go take Hip-Hop classes or try to teach classes because I do miss it. I found my love for Ballet specifically only a couple of years ago. Although my love for it continues to grow more and more each day, I do still miss my roots and my first love when it comes to dancing.

Q: WHAT IS THE BEST LIFE ADVICE YOU’VE RECEIVED AND WHY?

A: “Everything happens for a reason.” This is something I live by. It really helps me get through the tough times and makes me see the positive in almost every situation.

 

Top Photo by Savanna Daniels

2018-19 KCB II Dancer Profile: Samantha Huebner

Meet Kansas City Ballet KCB II Dancer, Samantha Huebner. She’s danced as a Trainee with Kansas City Ballet for two years. This year she’s moved up to KCB II.

Q: TELL US WHY YOU BeCAME A DANCEr.

A: I became a dancer at the age of 3 because my mom needed another way for me to get rid of some extra energy! But I think as I became older, I chose to continue to pursue becoming a dancer because I fell in love with the work it requires. I love the feeling when I work really hard on something and it finally pays off. And, of course, I love the feeling and fun that comes with being on stage!

Q: WHAT QUESTION DO YOU GET ASKED THE MOST AS A DANCER?

A: The question, or statement, I get most often is: “Oh, so you probably have to watch what you eat, huh?” I always laugh and say that just like any other athlete in the world, we need food to fuel our bodies so that we can work. If I didn’t eat, I couldn’t dance, let alone perform! I eat when I am hungry. If I have cravings then I guess that’s what I’m having for dinner!

New Moves 2017. Samantha Huebner is front and center. Photography by Brett Pruitt and East Market Studios.
New Moves 2017. Samantha Huebner is front and center. Photography by Brett Pruitt and East Market Studios.

Q: WHAT IS SOMETHING MOST PEOPLE WOULDN’T KNOW ABOUT YOU?

A: I aspire to be a personal trainer when my ballet career comes to an end (hopefully far far in the future). I worked with a personal trainer this past summer and I fell in love with it all! She was so inspiring to me and I want to learn all I can from her and try to inspire others in the way she has inspired me.

Q: WHAT WAS THE BEST DANCING OR LIFE ADVICE YOU EVER RECEIVED AND WHY?

A: Your moods are contagious. Whenever you walk through the door of the studio, you have the chance to determine how you want people to respond to you. The energy you give off, is the energy that will come back to you. Moods are contagious. Bring positive energy into a room.

Q: HOW DO YOU STAY FIT AND HEALTHY OUTSIDE OF THE STUDIO?

A: Eat and sleep!! Those are so important in my eyes. If I don’t eat enough, I get really sleepy. If I don’t sleep enough, I get really irritable and cranky. I find that if I’m lacking in either one of these two things, my body starts shutting down in a way, physically and mentally as well. Of course I like to go to the gym and workout a bit but I have to eat and sleep or else I’d be a mess.

PAST PROFILE POSTS

Trainee Profile: Samantha Huebner

Top Photo by Brett Pruitt & East Market Studios

Devon Carney Talks Oz

From Devon Carney, Artistic Director:

There are films, plays, musicals, and all methods of performing arts disciplines telling this story of The Wizard of Oz. We are bringing a magical interpretation of L. Frank Baum’s incredible tale to life in dance form.

I’m so glad so many of you will be with us to witness this production on its world premiere run, right here in KC. This project is an elaborate collaboration between three North American ballet companies, Kansas City Ballet, Colorado Ballet and Canada’s Royal Winnipeg Ballet. Our combined efforts gave life to this uniquely whimsical experience for audiences and dancers alike.

Kansas City Ballet is honored to first perform the highly anticipated world premiere. It took an amazingly talented team of world class designers to produce this fresh, unique interpretation of a renowned piece of literature. Giving our dancers the chance to perform roles they’ve known since childhood is a remarkable treat.

That said, I’m excited for you to meet Dorothy Gale. The Wizard of Oz is her story. She’s the pivotal character—and what a character she is! A strong young lady full of courage and gumption, she doesn’t let anyone or anything stand in her way.

Courage, compassion, wisdom. Our Dorothy has all three. In short, she’s inspiring.

Dorothy is open to adventure and to making new friends. An adventurous spirit leads one to discover a bigger, broader world. In the end, though, home is where the heart yearns to be.

We hope you enjoy this stellar production and that you feel at home with us.

 

Top Photo by Brett Pruitt & East Market Studios

2018-19 Dancer Profile: Danielle Bausinger

Meet Kansas City Ballet Company Dancer, Danielle Bausinger. She’s danced with KCB since the 2014-15 season and will soon be dancing the lead role of the Wicked Witch of the West in Septime Webre’s world premiere of The Wizard of Oz at the Kauffman Center Oct. 12-21, 2018.

Q: TELL US WHY YOU BeCAME A DANCEr.

A: My mom loved to dance and worked at a local dance studio in New Jersey. So my sister and brothers all went to dance classes and I joined. We moved to California where I continued ballet, tap and jazz and at age 6 I decided I just wanted to focus on ballet to become a ballerina.

Q: WHAT DO YOU LIKE TO DO WHEN YOU’RE NOT DANCING?

A: I enjoy golfing, going to the movies, and spending time with my husband and dog.

Dancer: Danielle Bausinger. Photography: Kenny Johnson. Story lines and visual elements from the classic motion picture provided by Warner Bros. Theatre Ventures.
Dancer: Danielle Bausinger. Photography: Kenny Johnson.
Story lines and visual elements from the classic motion picture provided by Warner Bros. Theatre Ventures.

Q: WHAT IS SOMETHING MOST PEOPLE WOULDN’T KNOW ABOUT YOU?

A: I love all things Disney! I have been to every Disney park except Tokoyo. Disney movies always send good messages and life lessons even in their “fantasy” world.

Q: WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE SNACK?

A: I always like to have a cup of tea at lunch. It keeps my body warm and it relaxes my muscles.

Q: WHAT IS YOUR GUILTY PLEASURE AND WHY?

A: I love Elevé leotards. I can’t go in the store without coming out with a leo or an idea for a new custom one. They make me feel pretty while I’m dancing and they are very comfortable.

PAST PROFILE POSTS

Dancer Profile: Danielle Bausinger

Top Photo by Brett Pruitt & East Market Studios